Review: A Daughter's Courage by Renita D'Silva

A Daughter's Courage - Renita D'Silva

Published by: Bookouture (26th May 2017)

 

ISBN: 978-1786811783

 

Source: Netgalley 

 

Rating: 5*

 

Synopsis:

1929. When a passionate love affair threatens to leave Lucy in disgrace, she chooses a respectable marriage over a life of shame. With her husband, coffee-plantation-owner James, she travels to her new home in India, leaving her troubled past behind her.

Everything in India is new to Lucy, from the jewel-coloured fabrics to the exotic spices. When her path crosses that of Gowri, a young woman who tends the temple on the plantation’s edge, Lucy is curious to find out more about her, and the events that lead her to live in isolation from her family…

 

Now. With her career in shatters and her heart broken by the man she thought was her future, Kayva flees from bustling Mumbai to her home town. A crumbling temple has been discovered in a village nearby, and with it letters detailing its tragic history – desperate pleas from a young woman called Gowri.

 

As Kavya learns of Gowri and Lucy’s painful story, she begins to understand the terrible sacrifices that were made and the decision the two women took that changed their lives forever. Can the secrets of the past help Kavya to rebuild her life?

 

Review:

Wow. What a myriad of emotions A Daughter's Courage evokes. I am feeling so many different things right now! This book is so touching, heartbreakingly sad yet uplifting and heartwarming. This isn't a book that I'd typically pick up and read, it was recommended to me by my very good friend, and fellow book blogger, Jules (who I'm so pleased to see get a mention in the book acknowledgements :))

 

The three main characters, Lucy, Gowri and Kavya are all so well written. They are such distinct personalities and so different from each other. I defy anyone not to fall in love with Gowri, her soul shines through. Lucy is so different from Gowri and I just couldn't wait to find out where the story would go next. When the two women meet, the interaction is so brilliantly described, it really felt as if I was stood right there, breathing in the rich Indian aromas as I witnessed the meeting. Kavya is different again and thoroughly modern. I really enjoyed how the threads of their individual stories intertwined and then came together.

 

India really came to life from 'the pages' (my kindle) as it was just depicted in such a wonderful way. The colours, from the jewel brights of the saris to the dirty brown of the mud, everything felt as though I was actually seeing it myself. Renita D'Silva has such a fantastic way with words. I also loved all the descriptions of the food that Gowri and the others were preparing; I've taken notes! A Daughter's Courage may have been the first of the author's books that I've read but it certainly won't be the last! Thanks to Bookouture and Netgalley for the ARC, and to Jules Mortimer for another great recommendation.