Blog Tour for The Blood-Dimmed Tide by Anthony Quinn. Today - about the author, the book and my review of The Blood-Dimmed Tide

The Blood-Dimmed Tide - Anthony Quinn

 

Anthony Quinn is an Irish writer and journalist whose first novel Disappeared was acclaimed by the Daily Mail as 'unquestionably one of the crime novels of the year, written in peerless prose.’ It was shortlisted for a Strand Literary Award by the book critics of the Guardian, LA Times,Washington Post, San Francisco Chronicle and other US newspapers. It was also listed by Kirkus Reviews as one of the top ten thrillers of 2012. His short stories have twice been shortlisted for a Hennessy/New Irish Writing award. He lives in County Tyrone, Northern Ireland.

 

The Blood-Dimmed Tide is the first in a series of three historical novels set in Ireland during WWI and the War of Independence. 

London, at the dawn of 1918 and Ireland’s most famous literary figure, WB Yeats, is immersed in supernatural investigations at his Bloomsbury rooms.

Haunted by the restless spirit of an Irish girl whose body is mysteriously washed ashore in a coffin, Yeats undertakes a perilous journey back to Ireland with his apprentice ghost-catcher Charles Adams to piece together the killer’s identity.

Surrounded by spies, occultists and Irish rebels, the two are led on a gripping journey along Ireland’s wild Atlantic coast, through the ruins of its abandoned estates, and into its darkest, most haunted corners.

Falling under the spell of dark forces, Yeats and his ghost-catcher come dangerously close to crossing the invisible line that divides the living from the dead.

 

Publication date: 23rd October 2014

 

Publisher: No Exit Press

 

ISBN: 9781843444657

 

Score: 3/5

 

Synopsis: 

London at the dawn of 1918 and Ireland's most famous literary figure, W. B. Yeats, is immersed in supernatural investigations at his Bloomsbury rooms. Haunted by the restless spirit of an Irish girl whose body is mysteriously washed ashore in a coffin, Yeats undertakes a perilous journey back to Ireland with his apprentice ghost-catcher Charles Adams, to piece together the killer's identity. Surrounded by spies, occultists and diehard female rebels, the two are led on a journey along Ireland's wild Atlantic coast, through the ruins of it's abandoned estates, and into it's darkest, most haunted corners. Falling under the spell of dark forces, Yeats and his ghost-catcher come dangerously close to crossing the invisible line that divides the living from the dead.

 

My review:

Although I'm not normally interested in reading historical fiction, I happened to see this book's cover picture and found it utterly charming, not to mention a little enticing. So, I'm guilty of completely judging this book by it's cover.

This novel has elements of several genres including crime, thriller, romance, espionage, supernatural and the occult, but I think this is what lets it down. I found the content a bit repetitive and the narrative switch between first person by Charles Adams and third person confusing. Some of the issues raised in earlier chapters remained loose ends as the focus of the story kept changing.

The descriptive prose about Sligo and the Irish coast at the turn of the century is this book's saving grace. It flows beautifully and make the place appear so charming. I just wish I had enjoyed the rest of the book as much as the cover promised.